The Generative City

The Generative City

Urban Solutions | February 2013
By Ayesha and Parag Khanna
Great cities will be increasingly distinguished by their capacity to produce inclusive, sustainable and innovative outcomes. These cities will be driven by empowered citizens, ubiquitous technologies and policies that enable the actors of the generative city to collaborate on boundary-breaking projects that redefine the way we work, live and play.

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Startup Sovereigns

Startup Sovereigns

Foreign Policy | February 8, 2013
By Parag Khanna and Sawsan Gad
The competition for authority within and between states is as intense as ever in history. And it's due not just to the current wave of democratic experimentation occurring across Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia, but also the rising power of corporations, NGOs, religious groups, terrorists, and other individuals who today are financially, militarily, and technologically empowered like never before.

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Investors, beware: It’s a bumpy ride on the new Burma Road

Investors, beware: It’s a bumpy ride on the new Burma Road

Quartz | 31 January 2013
By Parag Khanna
Myanmar began and ended 2012 as the frontier market on everyone’s mind. As a large, populous and strategically located country, Myanmar naturally invites the imagination to marvel at its possibilities—and investment opportunities. The powers that be are keen to modernize but still cautious about how quickly they open up.

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The Power of Moore's Law in a World of Geotechnology

The Power of Moore's Law in a World of Geotechnology

The National Interest | January-February 2013
By Marc Goodman and Parag Khanna
WHILE CYBERSPACE and social media have grabbed global headlines in recent years, other major technology clusters will have an even more seismic impact on geopolitics in coming decades. They include biotechnology, robotics and artificial intelligence. Indeed, these technologies are coming of age and experiencing exponential innovation as well as growth—and not just in the United States. New contenders, including Asian state-run laboratories, corporate investors, DIY/maker groups, terrorists and organized criminals are all competing to harness and leverage technology in pursuit of their interests. In this rapidly changing environment, America risks having its international dominance undermined by these emerging technologies and players, much as Arab despots have been overthrown by protesters empowered in part by social media.

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India Should Embrace Technology

India Should Embrace Technology

Hindustan Times | November 16, 2012
By Gaurav Chowdhury
India needs to quickly embrace technology, modernise retail trade and focus on infrastructure development to spin jobs and boost incomes. If it fails to do so, the growth process may leave behind a significant section of the population and bring on socio-political upheavals that the country can ill-afford, leading geo-strategist Parag Khanna has cautioned.

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Does Norway Hold the Key to Solving South China Sea Dispute?

Does Norway Hold the Key to Solving South China Sea Dispute?

CNN.com | November 14, 2012
By Parag Khanna and John Gilman
The South China Sea has returned to the geopolitical spotlight, eclipsing the Taiwan Straits as the region's most volatile flashpoint. But quite unlike the Taiwan or the associated Quemoy/Matsu dispute, the South China Sea's claimant nations are at least as interested in developing the region's economic potential as they are in asserting sovereignty and building military bases.

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Why Syria's Fragmentation Is Turkey's Opportunity

Why Syria's Fragmentation Is Turkey's Opportunity

The Atlantic | October 24, 2012
By Soner Cagaptay and Parag Khanna
One-and-a-half years into Syria's civil war, the latest chapter is the armed hostility between Syria and Turkey, once a friend of the Assad regime. A century ago, it was Western powers that dismantled and carved up the Ottoman Empire after World War I. Today, Turkey can place itself in the driver's seat of shaping the borders of the emerging Near East map.

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The new Silk Road is made of iron — and stretches from Scotland to Singapore

The new Silk Road is made of iron — and stretches from Scotland to Singapore

Quartz | September 28, 2012
By Parag Khanna
At some point in the next 200 million years, according to Yale University scientists, the North American and Eurasian tectonic plates will collide at the North Pole. When they are eventually joined by Africa, the singular super-continent will re-emerge, reminiscent of the Pangea that existed hundreds of millions of years ago.

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