Renaissance Man: Parag Khanna on the Next Wave of Post-National Power

TANK | Spring 2011
By Shumon Basar
"Colonies were once conquered, now countries are bought." So says Parag Khanna, author of the new book How to Run the World. It’s not a manual for James Bond-style megalomaniacs, nor is it expert advice on long-distance marathons. It’s the follow-up to Khanna’s first treatise on “late globalisation,” The Second World (2008), in which he defined this term as applying to a nation that exhibits both first- and third-world characteristics simultaneously.

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Egypt, Libya, and the Folly of the BRICs

Egypt, Libya, and the Folly of the BRICs

Harvard Business Review | February 22, 2011
By Parag Khanna
What do Egypt, Iran, Pakistan, and Nigeria all have in common? They are very populous, Muslim-majority countries, all facing constant political unrest and on the brink of collapse. And yet they are also all part of Goldman Sachs' "Next Eleven," the much-anticipated extension of its fabled category of "BRICs" — comprised of Brazil, Russia, India, and China.

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Forbes Book Review of "How to Run the World"

Forbes Book Review of "How to Run the World"

Forbes.com | February 21, 2011
By Elmira Bayrasli
In How To Run the World, Parag Khanna envisions a new world order. Business and entrepreneurship are no longer the maligned enemy of social good, but an “indispensable” public partner. In fact, Khanna, a fellow on American strategy at the New America Foundation, says, boardrooms are the new diplomatic outposts and military bases. Hence it is necessary for “CEOs to know as much as diplomats about the world and its various elements – they can’t rely on embassies to act on its behalf anymore – and those that know this are those that are succeeding.”

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Parag Khanna Discusses Egypt and Mega-Diplomacy on CNN's Parker Spitzer

CNN | February 14, 2011
How should America engage in Egypt after the ouster of its long standing ally Hosni Mubarak? Parag advocates a mega-diplomacy approach in which the U.S. makes friends with all players in the new Egyptian political spectrum, including the Muslim Brotherhood and other opposition groups, and uses its companies, NGOs, universities, and other domestic resources to build partnerships that advance the development of the Egyptian economy and society.

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Insistent, Not Imperial

Insistent, Not Imperial

Huffintgton Post | February 14, 2011
What others want for themselves is more important than what we want for them -- always.

As the daily drama of street demonstrations, shuttle diplomacy, and backroom deals has unfolded in Egypt over the past three weeks, the Obama administration gradually shifted its stance from standing by the side of now former president Hosni Mubarak -- as so many presidents before Obama have done -- to accepting and encouraging his incremental concessions to the demands of the Egyptian people.

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Mubarak's Speech Satisfies No One

Mubarak's Speech Satisfies No One

CNN.com | February 10, 2011
The high expectations of protesters in Tahrir Square turned to fury Thursday after Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak delivered a speech in which he made no mention of leaving office before his term ends in September. Crowds had swarmed the square for hours as speculation grew that Mubarak was stepping aside after 30 years in power. They heard instead from the president that he was "delegating power" to Vice President Omar Suleiman. Now the focus shifts to Friday, one of two regular protest days (the other is Tuesday) on the demonstrators' weekly schedule.

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PSFK on How to Run The World: "A Roadmap To Creating A Better World"

PSFK | February 4, 2011
In his new book, How to Run the World, writer and international relations expert Parag Khanna talks about the challenges faced across the world; depleting natural resources, political and economic instability and environmental stress, comparing today’s global scenario to that of the Medieval Ages. He also offers a blueprint for creating a stable world by encouraging active participation of multinational firms, non-profit organizations, innovators and other communities in the governance of the nations.

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Everybody Wants to Rule the World -- KVON Radio

KVON Radio | February 3, 2011
Interview with Jeff Schechman
As we wake up each morning to a new geopolitical crises, in countries we usually don’t think about very often, it's more important then ever to understand how the world works. We talk about globalization and a border-less world, yet their are more nation states and political borders then ever before. Here at home we hear criticism of trans-national corporations, yet where do we think that the jobs will come from, to move much of the world out of poverty.

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Foreign Policy Digest -- Review of How to Run the World

Foreign Policy Digest | January 31, 2011
By Mahanth Joishy
How to Run the World was released in January 2011 as author Parag Khanna’s sophomore effort. It’s an unambiguously ambitious title for a book about foreign affairs. A number of strangers who have seen me with the tome in hand gave me curious glances and requests like “get back to me once you’ve figured all of that out.”

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The Exercise of Power: Running the World

The Economist | January 27, 2011
SOME books about global politics charge at you full tilt, brandishing a radical idea for changing the world. Others pick their way through the nettles. The romantic in every reader yearns for a new order to sweep aside the impediments of the old. The sceptic knows that life is complicated. Both sorts of books have their strengths, but—on the evidence of two new accounts of 21st-century power—caution has the upper hand just now.

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Davos: Congress of the New Middle Ages

Davos: Congress of the New Middle Ages

The Wall Street Journal | January 24, 2011
By Parag Khanna
The last year or two have witnessed no shortage of silver-bullet rhetoric to deal with the world’s most pressing challenges. A global economic “G-2” of the U.S. and China was proposed to sort out the imbalances between savings and deficit countries; the United Nations General Assembly devoted several days in September to the “Millennium Development Goals” that address hunger, poverty, and other socio-economic ills; grand summits were held in Copenhagen and Cancun to craft a global climate treaty; and experts spoke of a “Grand Bargain” to freeze Iran’s nuclear program.

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Route to Global Renewal

Route to Global Renewal

TIME | January 31, 2011
By Parag Khanna
In one of the most memorable scenes in cinema, Orson Welles' Harry Lime rides the giant Viennese Ferris wheel in the 1949 classic The Third Man and muses, "In Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love; they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock."

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The Art of Running the World

Swiss Style | January 2011
Profile by Jean Francois Begun
Henry Kissinger once said that, “You do not design a new world order as an emergency measure. But you need an emergency to bring about a new world order.” Quite poignant words given today’s environment, where we seem to be hurtling toward a perfect storm of energy consumption, population growth and food and water insufficiencies.

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The Neo-Renaissance Man

Asia Times | January 22, 2011
By Pepe Escober
Steve Clemons of the New America Foundation describes Parag Khanna as a "global futurist". Now that's a sterling job. Even apart from the obviously sexy Isaac Asimov overtones, this entails crisscrossing the planet identifying future trends and getting paid for it. On the other hand, it's true that an array of single-minded wonks slumped in their think-tank chairs also love to deploy this job description. That's certainly not the case with Khanna - a young, dynamic, hyper-connected insider who's actually been all over the world armed with a good education, and has a sense of history, no prejudice, an open mind and delightful conversational skills.

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